Struggling with a “Higher Power”?

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There is a consciousness and an awareness that exists always and everywhere—the name you give it is unimportant.   

— Bernie S. Siegel M.D.

So many people are stuck on the idea that if they don’t believe in a traditional version of “God” that they are somehow excluded from the benefits of meditation or prayer. This doctor offers an alternative view here:

Feeling Alone and Afraid?

The Wine Diet

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Last night, I had an unusual dinner … Wendy’s french fries and a large chocolate frosty. I like the way the hot salty fries are cooled by the sweet bliss of the frosty.

I’m on a sugar detox diet, allegedly, but I fell off the wagon with a cookie here, a muffin there, and now I’m on the sugar overload diet.

Drinking wine used to take care of my sweet addiction, although wine itself contains very little sugar. Like diet drinks, it still seemed to satisfy my sweet tooth. Later on, sugary mixed drinks were my appetite suppressant, causing me to eat far less than I normally would for dinner. They even functioned as a meal replacement. And because the alcohol was nonnegotiable, I could bypass desserts with ease. I’ve found through experience, however, that I have to get rid of all sugar to be successful, just like with alcohol. I will never be a moderate sweet eater. I’ve tried. It doesn’t work.

I approach this addiction a lot like I did with drinking: I binge on sugar because I’ve come up with a plan, which will start tomorrow. (My plans always start tomorrow, rarely today.) Tomorrow, I will start my sugar shut-out for let’s say … three weeks. (And by sugar, I mean pasta and bread and white rice too.)  I know I’m going to go through sugar withdrawal — I’ll be tired and edgy for a few days, craving sugar in all my waking hours. And just like with wine, I have to binge to really prepare for the purge. I usually begin on a Monday, but because it’s a holiday, I’ve allowed myself an extra day of sweet indulgence.

It just so happens that Hip Sobriety has some perfect advice for the occasion:

Sugar Addiction in Sobriety: Why it Happens + 13 Tips How to Break it.

In one hour, when the doors open, I will be back at Wendy’s, claiming my final Frosty.

Wish me luck!

The Eclipse and Sobriety

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Today, people all across the U.S. are making plans to watch a miracle of timing, when the moon and sun align to produce an astronomical phenomena that momentarily transforms the way we see the world.

I would say that your decision not to drink today is just as awe-inspiring, transformative, and mind-altering as the eclipse. Your decision to take back your power sends shock waves through the universe, leaving no one untouched by its wave of positive energy.

You are a force to be reckoned with. Unleash your power. 💕

 

 

40 Days of Sobriety. Try It!

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Hip Sobriety is a legend in the sober blogosphere. I am so inspired by their stuff. Here is just one paragraph from their “manifesto”:

2. You do not need to hit rock bottom. Some 90% of folks who struggle with alcohol (in the US) are not clinically addicted. We have an idea that we need to be falling down and lose everything to address our relationship with alcohol. Not true. If you’re worried about your drinking, if it’s causing shame or fear or keeping you from the life you’re dreaming about, that’s more than enough to begin. And the sooner you start, the easier it is.

Anyway, if you’re struggling with sobriety or want to reinforce it, they offer an email-based 40-day Mantra course for $ 34 that looks right up my alley. They also have an 8-week “Sobriety School.” I totally would have done this when I was struggling, had I known it was out there. Looks like a great way to jump-start the process.  💕

Myth of the High-Bottom Drinker

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A friend recently said to me, “At least you’re a high-bottom alcoholic, if you have to be one.” I couldn’t really agree with her about being a high-bottom anything. It kind of depends on where you might have ended up had you not begun drinking at all. In other words, you don’t have to be homeless to have been hit pretty damn hard by the “grapes of wrath.”

I am reposting this blog (written at a blessed 10 days sober!) because I think we sometimes use the term “high bottom” to show that we weren’t really all that bad, were we?

Day 10 at a Fork in the Road